Environmental Health Sciences

Environmental Health Sciences is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 to increase public understanding of the scientific links between environmental factors and human health.

EHS partners with two organizations, the Science Communication Network and Advancing Green Chemistry, to oversee the Science Communication Fellows program. Every year since 2007, the program hosts 10 outstanding researchers to develop the skills needed to present and communicate the complexities of environmental health to the public.

In partnership with Advancing Green Chemistry, EHS is developing tools and protocols that will help chemists reduce the likelihood that new chemicals they are bringing to market will be hazardous.

From its base in Charlottesville, Virginia, EHS also publishes two websites, Environmental Health News and The Daily Climate. Edited by a team of experienced, award-winning journalists and environmental health experts, EHN and TDC offer original reporting and compile news stories from around the world to give a comprehensive daily look at the vital issues in science, environment and health.

Current News

Environmental Health News
Amid pollution problems, China's health food industry blossoms. That growing fear of China’s dangerously dirty environment has given birth to one of the fastest-growing segments of China’s consumer marketplace: foods with perceived health benefits. Mar 29, 2015
The hotly contested link between science denial and conspiracy theories. In 2013, the University of Bristol psychologist Stephan Lewandowsky and colleagues published two papers containing a provocative claim: A tendency to endorse conspiracy theories, they suggested, makes people more likely to challenge various aspects of science, too. Mar 29, 2015
Video: Earth Hour 2015: World cities go dark for climate change. Cities around the world have been temporarily plunged into darkness to raise awareness about climate change. Millions of people across the globe switched off their lights for an hour at 8.30pm local time in support of the WWF's Earth Hour initiative. Mar 29, 2015
California drought: Sierra Nevada snowpack hits historic low. The abominable snowpack in the Sierra Nevada reached an unprecedented low this week, dipping below the historic lows in 1977 and 2014 for the driest winter in 65 years of record-keeping. Mar 29, 2015
Rise in government insurance rates to mirror rising waters, flood debt. At her small beach house that sits in a flood zone, Nancy Loft-Powers worries. The prospect of rising water, she said, isn’t what bothers her. It’s the expected rise in the cost of her $7,500 yearly flood insurance. Mar 29, 2015
More…
The Daily Climate
The hotly contested link between science denial and conspiracy theories. In 2013, the University of Bristol psychologist Stephan Lewandowsky and colleagues published two papers containing a provocative claim: A tendency to endorse conspiracy theories, they suggested, makes people more likely to challenge various aspects of science, too. Mar 29, 2015
Video: Earth Hour 2015: World cities go dark for climate change. Cities around the world have been temporarily plunged into darkness to raise awareness about climate change. Millions of people across the globe switched off their lights for an hour at 8.30pm local time in support of the WWF's Earth Hour initiative. Mar 29, 2015
California drought: Sierra Nevada snowpack hits historic low. The abominable snowpack in the Sierra Nevada reached an unprecedented low this week, dipping below the historic lows in 1977 and 2014 for the driest winter in 65 years of record-keeping. Mar 29, 2015
Rise in government insurance rates to mirror rising waters, flood debt. At her small beach house that sits in a flood zone, Nancy Loft-Powers worries. The prospect of rising water, she said, isn’t what bothers her. It’s the expected rise in the cost of her $7,500 yearly flood insurance. Mar 29, 2015
Duke Energy CEO loses $600K in pay over coal ash pollution. Duke Energy Corp. CEO Lynn Good saw her pay docked about $600,000 in the aftermath of last year's massive spill of collected coal ash that coated 70 miles of a North Carolina river in sludge containing toxic heavy metals. Mar 29, 2015
More…