Environmental Health Sciences

Environmental Health Sciences is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 to increase public understanding of the scientific links between environmental factors and human health.

We work in three areas – science, media and public education – to close the gap between good science and great policy.

EHS partners with organizations such as the Science Communication Network and Advancing Green Chemistry to help researchers develop the skills needed to present and communicate the complexities of environmental health to the public.

In partnership with Advancing Green Chemistry, EHS is developing tools and protocols that will help chemists reduce the likelihood that new chemicals they are bringing to market will be hazardous.

From its base in Charlottesville, Virginia, EHS also publishes two news websites, Environmental Health News and The Daily Climate. Edited by a team of experienced, award-winning journalists and environmental health experts, EHN and TDC offer original reporting and compile news stories from around the world to give a comprehensive daily look at the vital issues in science, environment and health.

Current News

Environmental Health News
Another nuclear weapons contractor pays millions to settle charges of illegally diverting federal funds. Allegations of illegally spending federal funds to lobby for new funds now encompass contractors working at six of the eight U.S. nuclear weapons sites. Jan 21, 2017
Donald Trump sees the future in coal. China sees the future in renewables. Who’s making the safer bet? In Donald Trump's vision of America, some parts of the country's future look a lot like its past. Exhibit A: his promise to revive the flagging coal industry. Jan 21, 2017
All references to climate change have been deleted from the White House website. At 11:59 am eastern, the official White House website had a lengthy information page about the threat of climate change and the steps the federal government had taken to fight it. At noon, at the instant Donald Trump took office, the page was gone, as well as any mention of climate change or global warming. Jan 21, 2017
Trump White House fabricates wages figure on first day. Shortly after Donald Trump was sworn in as president on Friday, the White House said that eliminating power plant climate rules, a clean water rule and other environmental regulations would “greatly help American workers, increasing wages by more than $30 billion over the next 7 years.” Jan 21, 2017
Second winner of environmental prize killed months after Berta Cáceres death. Goldman prize winner Isidro Baldenegro López, who was known for his activism against illegal logging, was shot dead months after Berta Cáceres was murdered. Jan 21, 2017
More…
The Daily Climate
Donald Trump sees the future in coal. China sees the future in renewables. Who’s making the safer bet? In Donald Trump's vision of America, some parts of the country's future look a lot like its past. Exhibit A: his promise to revive the flagging coal industry. Jan 21, 2017
All references to climate change have been deleted from the White House website. At 11:59 am eastern, the official White House website had a lengthy information page about the threat of climate change and the steps the federal government had taken to fight it. At noon, at the instant Donald Trump took office, the page was gone, as well as any mention of climate change or global warming. Jan 21, 2017
Trump White House fabricates wages figure on first day. Shortly after Donald Trump was sworn in as president on Friday, the White House said that eliminating power plant climate rules, a clean water rule and other environmental regulations would “greatly help American workers, increasing wages by more than $30 billion over the next 7 years.” Jan 21, 2017
Big unfinished business for Trump: Colorado River deals, the shrinking Salton Sea. Two days before President Donald Trump's inauguration, outgoing Interior Secretary Sally Jewell laid out a game plan for averting serious water shortages along the Colorado River. Jan 21, 2017
Trump White House takes down Native Americans web page from website. Change is inevitable when a presidential administration occurs. Within hours of the presidential transition, the White House, now under the control of President Donald Trump, took down the Native Americans web page that was part of the Obama White House website for the past eight years. Jan 21, 2017
More…