Environmental Health Sciences

Environmental Health Sciences is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 to increase public understanding of the scientific links between environmental factors and human health.

EHS partners with two organizations, the Science Communication Network and Advancing Green Chemistry, to oversee the Science Communication Fellows program. Every year since 2007, the program hosts 10 outstanding researchers to develop the skills needed to present and communicate the complexities of environmental health to the public.

In partnership with Advancing Green Chemistry, EHS is developing tools and protocols that will help chemists reduce the likelihood that new chemicals they are bringing to market will be hazardous.

From its base in Charlottesville, Virginia, EHS also publishes two websites, Environmental Health News and The Daily Climate. Edited by a team of experienced, award-winning journalists and environmental health experts, EHN and TDC offer original reporting and compile news stories from around the world to give a comprehensive daily look at the vital issues in science, environment and health.

Current News

Environmental Health News
Appeals court rules FDA can continue allowing antibiotics in animal feed. A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can continue its policy of allowing widespread antibiotic use in animal feed – a practice believed by many to contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant “superbug” bacteria. Jul 25, 2014
Exposure to pesticides in pregnant rats linked to 3 generations of disease. New research argues that exposure to the pesticide Methoxychlor could cause diseases three generations later, in offspring who were never exposed to the Methoxychlor themselves. Jul 25, 2014
Japanese monkeys' abnormal blood linked to Fukushima disaster: Study. Wild monkeys in the Fukushima region of Japan have blood abnormalities linked to the radioactive fall-out from the 2011 nuclear power plant disaster, according to a new scientific study that may help increase the understanding of radiation on human health. Jul 25, 2014
Your next roadside attraction: Carbon storage. Hitting the road this summer? Take a closer look at the blur of the roadside shrubbery and grass. It soaks up a lot of carbon. With better management, it could soak up a lot more. Jul 25, 2014
Under water: The EPA’s struggle to combat pollution. For years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been frustrated in its efforts to pursue hundreds of cases of water pollution - repeatedly tied up in legal fights about exactly what bodies of water it has the authority to monitor and protect. Jul 25, 2014
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The Daily Climate
Your next roadside attraction: Carbon storage. Hitting the road this summer? Take a closer look at the blur of the roadside shrubbery and grass. It soaks up a lot of carbon. With better management, it could soak up a lot more. Jul 25, 2014
Colorado judge strikes down Longmont fracking ban. A Boulder County District Court judge has struck down Longmont's fracking ban but said the ban can remain in place while the city considered an appeal. Judge D.D. Mallard issued the summary judgment on Thursday. In the ruling, she said Longmont's charter amendment clearly conflicted with the state's regulations and its interest in the efficient development of oil and gas deposits. Jul 25, 2014
Kudzu: The plant that ate the South now heads north. As the climate warms, the vine that ate the American South is starting to gnaw at parts of the North, too. Agronomists and landscapers fear what the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Lewis Ziska says is like “a bad 1950s science-fiction plant movie.” Climate change is partly to blame, Ziska said. Jul 25, 2014
Colorado River Basin drying up faster than previously thought. Seven Western states that rely on the Colorado River Basin for valuable water are drawing more heavily from groundwater supplies than previously believed, a new study finds, the latest indication that an historic drought is threatening the region’s future access to water. Jul 25, 2014
China's plan to limit coal use could spur consumption for years. Under pressure to reduce smog and greenhouse gas emissions, the Chinese government is considering a mandatory cap on coal use, the main source of carbon pollution from fossil fuels. But it would be an adjustable ceiling that would allow coal consumption to grow for years, and policy makers are at odds on how long the nation’s emissions will rise. Jul 25, 2014
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