Environmental Health Sciences

Environmental Health Sciences is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 to increase public understanding of the scientific links between environmental factors and human health.

We work in three areas – science, media and public education – to close the gap between good science and great policy.

EHS partners with organizations such as the Science Communication Network and Advancing Green Chemistry to help researchers develop the skills needed to present and communicate the complexities of environmental health to the public.

In partnership with Advancing Green Chemistry, EHS is developing tools and protocols that will help chemists reduce the likelihood that new chemicals they are bringing to market will be hazardous.

From its base in Charlottesville, Virginia, EHS also publishes two news websites, Environmental Health News and The Daily Climate. Edited by a team of experienced, award-winning journalists and environmental health experts, EHN and TDC offer original reporting and compile news stories from around the world to give a comprehensive daily look at the vital issues in science, environment and health.

Current News

Environmental Health News
EPA welcomed industry feedback before reversing pesticide ban, ignoring health concerns. Before the Environmental Protection Agency issued its March 29 decision to reverse a proposed ban on the pesticide chlorpyrifos, the agency considered information from industry groups that wanted to keep it on the market, according to internal agency documents. Aug 19, 2017
PHOTOESSAY: Humanity's hand in shaping the Everglades. Adam Nadel sought to photograph the reality of a region that has been shaped for generations by the lives and actions of humans. Aug 19, 2017
Invasive lionfish may be superfish hybrids. It’s been more than 20 years since one of the most destructive invasive species in history was released off the coast of Florida. Originally from the Indian and Pacific Oceans, predatory lionfish have invaded the western Atlantic Ocean, spreading from the American east coast through the Caribbean to southern Brazil, devastating coastal ecosystems with their voracious appetites. Now, new research has revealed that invasive lionfish are not quite what they seem. Aug 19, 2017
EXCLUSIVE: India threatens Philip Morris with 'punitive action' over alleged violations. The Indian government has threatened Philip Morris International Inc (PM.N) with "punitive action" over the tobacco giant's alleged violation of the country's anti-smoking laws according to a letter sent to the company by the health ministry. Aug 19, 2017
'Superbugs' surging in Brazilian lakes, rivers, seas. A new study, to be published in November in the journal Science of the Total Environment, found that the waterways in Brazil’s two biggest cities have become “major sources of multidrug-resistant bacteria,” reports SciDev.Net. Aug 19, 2017
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The Daily Climate
PHOTOESSAY: Humanity's hand in shaping the Everglades. Adam Nadel sought to photograph the reality of a region that has been shaped for generations by the lives and actions of humans. Aug 19, 2017
Invasive lionfish may be superfish hybrids. It’s been more than 20 years since one of the most destructive invasive species in history was released off the coast of Florida. Originally from the Indian and Pacific Oceans, predatory lionfish have invaded the western Atlantic Ocean, spreading from the American east coast through the Caribbean to southern Brazil, devastating coastal ecosystems with their voracious appetites. Now, new research has revealed that invasive lionfish are not quite what they seem. Aug 19, 2017
What we still don't know about the Sun. When the Moon dims the Sun for a few minutes next week, scientists will get a rare view of our star. Studying an eclipse seems almost quaint — we have telescopes that continuously observe the Sun and NASA is sending a probe to it next year. What further knowledge can we gain? Aug 19, 2017
How the U.S. Navy is responding to climate change. It’s been more than 20 years since one of the most destructive invasive species in history was released off the coast of Florida. Originally from the Indian and Pacific Oceans, predatory lionfish have invaded the western Atlantic Ocean, spreading from the American east coast through the Caribbean to southern Brazil, devastating coastal ecosystems with their voracious appetites. Now, new research has revealed that invasive lionfish are not quite what they seem., Forest Reinhardt and Michael Toffel, Harvard Business School professors, talk about how a giant, global enterprise that operates and owns assets at sea level is fighting climate change—and adapting to it. Aug 19, 2017
Trump to tap House Republican as NASA chief: report. President Trump is close to tapping Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) to be NASA’s next administrator, the Houston Chronicle reported Thursday. Aug 19, 2017
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